We Should Have Listened To The Prophets

Bible Prophecy And Its Application For The Present Day

News 12 Investigation: Shedding light on Aiken County EMS

Written By: kkeithnr - Aug• 29•13


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  • News 12 Investigation: Shedding light on Aiken County EMS

News 12 during 6 o’clock / Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2013

AIKEN, S.C. (WRDW) — We won’t uncover his face, give his name, or even atmosphere his loyal voice.

“You could remove your jobs over this interview?” asks News 12′s Chad Mills.

“Yes, we could,” answers a stream Aiken County EMS workman in a sit-down talk with News 12. “We should have a lot improved coverage. There’s no excuse.”

But this EMS workman believes he has an vicious story to tell, a demur to clear, and he wants everybody to know what he says is going on behind a doors of Aiken County EMS.

“Most people entrance in off a transport can’t mount it,” he says of his employer.

This workman says Paramedics and EMTs are stability to leave Aiken County for other ambulance services in adjacent counties.

In 2006, a identical exodus done headlines.

“Despite a new raise, 18 percent of Aiken County EMS workers quit final year,” News 12 reported in 2006.

Recently, that series has proven to be greater. In FY2013, Aiken County EMS saw a 34 percent turnover rate, according to Aiken County Administrator Clay Killian.

The workman we interviewed has seen that trend.

“I can lay here and contend that we know, in a past year to dual years, we’ve mislaid during slightest dual or 3 good medics, we’ve mislaid several good intermediates, and again, we’ve had basement come in like a revolving door,” he says.

While he points to a series of factors, he says a categorical reason is low pay.

“I trust that Saluda creates between $4,000 and $6,000 some-more a year starting out. McCormick is during slightest $1,500 to during slightest $2,000 some-more a year, and that’s just, again, starting,” he tells News 12.

Research uncover that even paramedics and EMTs in Allendale County are paid more. Allendale County has a FY2012 General Fund Budget of usually $7,000,304, compared to $52,359,442 in Aiken County.

Then, there’s Williston Rescue Squad, a private use that now covers Barnwell County. Pay is so good there that 15 stream workers during a Rescue Squad formerly worked for Aiken County EMS, according to Operations Manager Phil Clarke.

In Aiken County, Basic EMTs start during $27,551.49 per year, Intermediate EMTs start during $30,793.84 per year, and Paramedics start during $33,862.37 per year. At Williston Rescue Squad, Basic EMTs start during $36,080 per year, Intermediate EMTs start during $39,000 per year, and Paramedics start during $42,640 per year.

Multiple sources tell News 12 that Aiken County EMS is so short-staffed that some stations aren’t even open on a daily basis, and when that happens, a workman we interviewed says response times turn longer and puts anyone in risk who lives, works or visits Aiken County.

“Have lives been mislaid due to response times?” asks Mills.

“I feel like they substantially have,” he says.

Generally, a common regulation many ambulance services use is one ambulance for each 10,000 people. To a north, Edgefield County passes that exam with 3 ambulances accessible for 26,000 people. To a south, Barnwell County does too with 4 for usually 22,000 people. Then there’s Aiken County, a county incomparable in area than both Edgefield and Barnwell Counties combined, where a a county owns usually 10 ambulances for roughly 162,812. Given that race size, a regulation says there should unequivocally be 16.

While a series of private services (Capital City, South Star, etc.) and nonprofits (Aiken Rescue) have authorization agreements with Aiken County EMS, a source says singular ambulances is still a problem. He says response times can infrequently be slow, as ambulances mostly contingency transport distant distances to respond to scenes of emergencies.

“If we can physically take myself to a hospital, I’m not job 911. Period. And that’s not usually this county. That’s any county,” he says.

But in this county, he says a lot of apparatus is subpar. Even yet a county skeleton to shortly reinstate 4 ambulances, he says there’s still some ambulances on a highway that would be unsuitable in other places, including one with 400,000 and miles.

“If [the Department of Health and Environmental Control] knew that each other change we’re carrying to get a AC’s remade on a units. We had an ambulance relapse on stage with a studious in a back,” a EMS workman admits. “You don’t feel like we should have to work in that environment.”

Our source, along with several other works, says oftentimes ambulances don’t have operative air-conditioning units, even when there’s a studious in a back. Air-conditioning, along with many other things, are regulated by DHEC code.

The workman estimates that 80 to 90 percent of his co-workers don’t like their management. In particular, he says many workers don’t like Aiken County EMS Coordinator Harvey Jay.

“Honestly, we don’t consider it’s his appearance since he is a pleasing chairman to be around, for a many part,” he says. “It’s usually a approach he runs things. It’s his policies. Harvey Jay has all a knowledge in a world. He’s been with Aiken EMS for 30 and years, and we consider that’s partial of a problem.”

But this workman doesn’t censure Jay. He blames Aiken County Council, who he claims fails to do enough.

“You’ve been told we have a problem regularly not usually by a news, not usually by your citizens, though by your employees,” a workman says to council. “Could that meant a disproportion between someone failing and not? Yes. It could.”

According to a county, in FY 2013-2014, Aiken County EMS requested $8,029,996 though got 5,239,528 in council’s upheld budget. Records from 2008 until now uncover that Aiken County Council has never saved Aiken County EMS a full volume it has requested.

The workman News 12 talked to in chairman is not a usually one who has contacted a newsroom. Multiple others have approached News 12 with identical concerns. In fact, an email that flush usually days ago that was sent to County Council points out many identical complaints.

“I am discontented during a fact that a county we live in and would rather work for, portion my neighbors in my backyard, has degraded to a indicate that many employees are withdrawal for improved opportunities,” writes former Aiken County EMS Paramedic Jason Bayne.

In an email response to Bayne, County Administrator Killian responded to Bayne. He mentioned that he met privately with staff during EMS domicile usually final week.

“Let me assure you,” writes Killian, “we are holding their comments really severely and commend we are during a really vicious connection with EMS.”

Killian has reliable this information to News 12. He pronounced conjunction he nor Harvey Jay would now do an talk with News 12, though he says they are looking into a matter, and they’re treating it really seriously.

Nevertheless, many of a workers who’ve contacted News 12 don’t have their hopes up.


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